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5 Ways to Build Better Social Media Communities

Social media has quickly emerged as a primary platform for engaging your customers and generating awareness about your company, products and promotions. But social media marketing is still so new that best practices quickly turn into ineffective gimmicks. The key is to start with a good community so you have a built-in audience for your products and services, regardless of the latest trend. So let’s look at five ways to build better social media communities for your small business.

The first step to any marketing channel plan is understanding its capabilities. Social media, for example, is used to build awareness, engage with a specific, targeted community and generate leads. So be sure you use this channel to promote these goals and then measure against them.

5 Ways to Build Better Social Media Communities

Now that you’re clear when to use social media marketing, you’ll want to build your community so you have an audience before you need it. While you should test your own theories that make the most sense to your business, these are a few best practices to get you started. Read more

Taking a Page From Print Ads To Improve Your Website

Every few years, I re-read David Ogilvy’s, Ogilvy on Advertising. Each time I crack open the familiar binding, I find something to inspire me. Filled with practical advice that is as relevant now as it was when it was written almost 30 years ago, I recommend you picking it up for the first time, or rediscover it as I do.

As I recently re-read this classic, it struck me how his recipe for print advertising success sounds a lot like successful websites. I’m sure I’m not the first to make this connection, but I wanted to share with you these time-tested marketing techniques that sell your product or service, regardless of the medium.

Taking Page From Print Ads To Improve Your Website Read more

5 Elements Every About Page Must Have

One of the hardest things to do is talk about yourself. Usually, when someone asks about you in a professional setting, you rattle off your credentials and experience. You talk about where you got your degree, the companies you’ve worked with, and how you ended up in your current role. When you’re done, how does the other person respond?

In many cases, the response is lukewarm. Nothing you said is relatable. Unless you have the same alma mater, nothing is tangible to the other person in the conversation. They might be impressed but they won’t have the answer to the most important question: “What’s in it for me?”

5 Elements Every About Page Must Have

Your about page often takes the same shape. This is your chance to talk about yourself to your website visitor so you go into credential and experience touting mode. *Yawn*. This approach is even less effective online because your website viewer can easily “walk away” from the conversation by hitting the back button.

How do you make your about page excite your reader and get her invested in your business? By incorporating these five elements: Read more